July 10, 2008

Obama must decide who he is

Posted in Israel-Palestine tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 2:13 pm by Mazin

Uri Avnery, avnery@actcom.co.il

It was just a passing conversation, but it has stuck in my memory. It was soon after the Six-Day War. I was coming out of the main hall of the Knesset, after making a speech calling for the immediate establishment of a Palestinian state.

Another Knesset member came down the corridor, a Labor Party man. Uri, he said, catching me by the arm, what the hell are you doing?

You could make a great career! But you are spoiling everything with your speeches about the Arabs. Why don’t you stop this nonsense?

I told him that he was quite right, but I couldn’t do it. I didn’t see any point in being in the Knesset if I could not speak the truth as I saw it.

I was elected again to the next Knesset, but again as the head of a tiny faction, which was never going to grow into a strong parliamentary force. The man’s prophesy came true.

In the course of the years I have often asked myself whether I was right then. Wouldn’t it have been better to give up principles, even for a short time, and win political power, without which it was impossible to realize them?

I don’t know if my choice was right. But I have never felt any remorse, because it was the right choice for me.

I remember this conversation when I hear about Barack Obama. He is facing the same dilemma.

There is, of course, one big difference. I was heading a very small faction in a very small country. He heads a huge party in a huge country. Nevertheless, the nature of the political dilemmas is the same in all countries, big or small.

This dilemma becomes even more acute in an election campaign.

These days I follow Barack Obama’s campaign, follow and understand, follow and get angry, follow and worry. I see him walking a tightrope across an abyss, and I worry.

I saw him performing before the Jewish lobby, where he broke all records for fawning, and I asked myself: What? Is this the man who will bring about the Great Change?

I can just imagine the discussion at Obama’s staff meetings. There he sits, surrounded by strategists, pollsters and PR people, all of them great experts.

Look, Obama, one of them is saying, these are the facts of life. The liberals are with you anyhow, you don’t have to win them over. The conservatives are against you, and nothing will change that. But in between there are millions of voters, who will decide the outcome. These you must attract. So don’t say anything unusual or radical.

You must tell them the things they want to hear, the second chimes in. Nothing that smells of hard-core liberals, please. We need the votes of rightists and evangelicals, too.

Anything definite will push away votes, a third insists. Every principle will upset somebody, so please don’t go into details. Just stick to vague generalities which appeal to everybody.

I have seen many candidates, both in Israel and the US, who started out with a clear and incisive program, and ended up as blurred, boring and faceless politicians.

This is the first big test for the aspiring leader: To know the difference between the permissible and the forbidden. Between the “art of the possible” and the “end justifies the means”.

How do people decide that a candidate is a “leader”? Is it a question of self-confidence? Strength of character? Charisma? Physical appearance? Success in previous tasks? Do they believe that he or she will indeed fulfill their election promises?

These days it is not easy to get a true impression, because the candidate is surrounded by a large group of “spin doctors” who manipulate his image, put words in his mouth and stage-manage his appearances. Television is not a modern edition of the ancient Athenian agora, as it is claimed. It is by its very nature a mendacious and falsifying instrument. Yet in spite of everything, it is the image of the candidate that is decisive in the final count.

Obama has impressed millions of citizens, especially the young. After years of moral decay under Bill Clinton and the power-obsessed folly of George Bush, they are longing for change, for a leader they can trust, who has a new message. And Obama has a wonderful talent for expressing this hope in uplifting speeches.

The danger is that when the edifying speeches dissipate, they will leave behind no leader with the character, the strength and the talent to fulfill the promise.

If Obama surrenders to his advisers and to the Satan whispering in his ear, he may gain votes from the other camp but lose his credibility, and not only in his own camp. The public may decide, instinctively, that “he hasn’t got it”. That, after all, he is not the leader one can trust.

On the other hand, if he is not prepared to make the necessary compromises, if he repels too many voters, he will be exposed to the opposite danger: That he will be left with his principles but without the ability to realize them.

He is facing four grueling months. The temptations are many, on either side. He must decide who he is, how much he is ready to give up without betraying himself.

And perhaps he must follow the example of Charles de Gaulle, who assumed power as a man of war and used the power to make a difficult, almost unbearably painful peace.

Even if I were asked, I would not presume to give advice to Obama, the candidate for the most powerful office in the world. Apart from the advice given in “Hamlet” by Polonius to his son Laertes: “This above all: To thine own self be true!”

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